inspiration

Melbourne. A visual journal.

There has been a DSLR lying dormant in my cupboard. The last post I did forced me to waken her, and I’m sure glad I did. I thought those photos came out surprisingly well. So I took her to Melbourne with me on the weekend, and managed to get some shots without slowing the days to a crawl. You may have seen a dork with online tutorials open on an iphone in one hand, and a Canon 1000D in the other. That was me. Working out how to best capture the beautiful and interesting things I was seeing; textures and shapes, streetscapes and surfaces, so much to take in. I don’t feel like these are particularly amazing photos, although I’m really happy with the portrait of my hubby Tim, and I think it’s a good first attempt at using only manual settings, but more importantly I have rediscovered my love for photography. I hope you enjoy.  (more…)

Advertisements

Teneriffe Woolstore Apartment – A coveted address & humble home.

Repurposed and renovated buildings are some of my favourite streetscapes to look upon. To me, there is not much more exciting than giving new meaning and life to unexpected spaces around a city. In Brisbane, the Teneriffe Woolstore Apartments are a beautiful example of this. With due respect and highlight to history, blending modern architecture into the the authentic features of the buildings, Teneriffe is one of the most sought after areas to live in Brisbane.  (more…)

The sweet home of jewellery designer Dorothy Love.

I find Hannah Johnson to be a warm, welcoming, charming and interesting lady. And I would describe her home as a reflection of these qualities.

A flying visit to her abode one day, made me so curious to explore it more. Things like vintage tea cups and interesting artwork always catch my eye, so I invited myself back and found out a bit more about the home that is Hannah’s.  (more…)

Eclectic Living Spaces

I am working on a project right now that needs to be eclectically decorated, which is why I’ve been investigating this design style recently. The key to eclectic is having a strong common denominator. So, you can gather a range of items, but they must have something in common. For example, a particular colour could be the dominating design feature, texture can make the design feature by having a variety of it, or a particular type of line or shape throughout the room.  The most common connecting factor I find in photos of eclectic design is colour. It’s an easy one to choose, because people often inadvertently gravitate to particular colours, and find themselves with a whole lot of things that mesh well into a scheme by colour.  I’ve been searching one of my favourite sources of inspiration… http://www.houzz.com. Here are a few photos I found, that mainly have colour as their design element.

I’m such a sucker for the eclectic-frames-on-the-wall look. I just love it. It’s such a good way to collate a range of interesting photos and art and other items, and looks really attractive in the right room. The high ceilings in this room are good because too many things on a shorter wall can look too cluttered.

The cool colours and raw concrete of this room would be the perfect work or sitting space in our hot Brisbane climate. I love the simple mixture of frames, and a plant on the table is such an easy way to spruce up the room. It provides necessary oxygen too!

This modern styled room is eclectic, but not cluttered. The limited colour palette allows varying patterns and shapes to bring life and vibrancy to the room.

How much fun is this room! It’s vibrant, comfortable, light and refreshing. I love that it looks loved and easy to live in.

Connected by black and white and grey, with splashes of colour, this small loft space has been divided into zones by texture and varying styles. It may feel somewhat cluttered and busy to some, but it certainly feels well lived in and interesting.

Hoo Ha Bar, Southbank – An eclectic and natural interior space.

I first saw Hoo Ha Bar in a write up in Brisbane’s fabulous Map Magazine. Having a love for coffee,  craft beer and exposed brick I immediately felt like I wanted to investigate.  It is quite unassuming from the outside, but stepping up and into the cafe from Tribune St is quite simply lovely.  It is light, airy and welcoming and the interior is humble but well put together.  (more…)

Shanty Town Interiors – Hong Kong

If you’ve googled ‘interiors’ lately, you’d know that the images that fill the page are spacious rooms made up of a palette of neutrals and browns, fairly minimal in design, with fancy furniture and clean surfaces. Then google ‘slum interiors’ and see how vastly different it is. Cluttered and dirty, crowded and small, colourful and well lived in, it presents a very different picture.

Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy perusing through Houzz as much as anyone, but I am also really intrigued and moved by the way that most of the world actually live, and the reasons why. Generally speaking, here in Australia, we are a fairly privileged society, where there is an economy and legislation that supports the provision of safe and habitable housing for all, although there are a number of people still without that, even here.

Hong Kong has a bit of a different story. There is a large influx of refugees into Hong Kong, mainly from Bangladesh. Many are victims of torture and kidnapping. When they escape their country, they can receive minimal support from the government if they register themselves as a refugee. They are allowed $1200 a month for rent, which although to some may seem generous, it goes directly to landlords. When you see the images of the homes they rent, you will realise this is not generous. (I could be wrong, but it looks to me like landlords are welcoming the government funding, and squashing as many people as they can into unmaintained buildings.) Refugees also get given a bag of food every 10 days, but they are not allowed to work. This has forced people with next to nothing into communities to try and survive together.

The Hong Kong government is not under any obligation to process refugee claims for visa, so people can be living for years, with no money, or ability to work, living in places that are not maintained to a habitable standard. Next time you think your house is too small, remember some of these images. There is no deliberate design here, although I am certain there are some tricks to using space well. They are intriguing and sad and beautiful all at once. Photo reference links are at the bottom of the post.

Rooftop Shanty Towns – dornob.com

Hong Kong’s Refugee Shame – timeout.co.uk

Exhibit on Hong Kong Micro Apartments Exposes Human Rights Issues – inhabitat.com

Aerial views of Hong Kong micro apartments – inhabitat.com